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What Gun Did Sonny Crockett Use [VERIFIED]



After the Dornaus & Dixon company went out of business in 1986, the product placement contract went to Smith & Wesson.[1][5][6] Starting with the third season, Sonny used a 2nd Generation series Smith & Wesson Model 645.[1] This was a full-sized 5-inch-barreled stainless steel service pistol in .45 ACP. Galco Gunleather again fashioned a "Miami Classic" shoulder holster for Johnson's new S&W 645 pistol. In the Galco Gunleather headquarters, there is a large display that contains the Miami Vice shoulder holster rig that Don Johnson wore, accompanied by an autographed photo of him. In late 1988 Smith & Wesson unveiled their new 3rd Generation Series of auto pistols, which coincided with the fifth and last season of the series; as the producers desired to keep Crockett as being seen to be on the cutting edge of weaponry, Sonny's Model 645 was replaced with the new Smith & Wesson Model 4506, also chambered in .45 ACP. This pistol had 20+ design improvements including a one piece arched grip. Sonny's 4506 can be seen in the beginning of the episode "Victim of Circumstance" when he is sitting in a cafe, looking at it.[7] Sonny also carried a .45 ACP Detonics Combat-Master backup gun in an ankle holster on his left leg, replacing the Pocket 9 from the pilot episode. It can be seen in the bar scene shootout in the "Prodigal Son" episodes.[8] In the last series episode "Freefall" Crockett is placing what looks to be a S&W CS45 (compact alloy framed .45 ACP) in his ankle holster.[9]




What Gun Did Sonny Crockett Use



Frequently investigated by IAD for wrongful deaths, Crockett was always exonerated. However, he retained a reputation with them as a "cowboy," which was somewhat justified by his willingness to use his fists to gain information or occasionally just because someone pushed him too far. He was noticeably more likely to hit someone than his partner Tubbs. In fact, some of his actions could be said to verge on police brutality, although always in defense of the innocent. When he and Tubbs were undercover, they would often pose as a team in which Tubbs did the talking while Crockett portrayed the impatiently threatening muscle in the background.


Crockett's belief in law enforcement began to erode as he encountered more and more corruption in the justice system he was working to uphold, feelings exacerbated by the wealth of lawyers and politically-minded senior police officials who were all too eager to handcuff his attempts at combating the influx of drugs into Miami if they felt it might advance their own career. Repeated personal tragedies only increased Crockett's growing distaste for his job; eventually, and perhaps inevitably, he began to burn out and question his once total commitment to the police force. Perhaps the biggest blow to his faith in justice occurred when an explosion left him with amnesia, leading him to mistakenly adopt his criminal alias Sonny Burnett and go to work for the very dealers he was fighting so hard to destroy. The whole sequence of events left him traumatised at what he had done, and struggling to regain the trust and loyalty of the rest of the Vice team.


His many romances show how suceptible Crockett could be to women. Indeed, he seemed to have a strong need to protect them. This was particularly seen in "Death and the Lady," when Glantz's sadism towards women enraged Crockett, first into saying, "You know what really turns me on? The idea of you in a room with all the fathers of all the girls you've turned out." By the end of the episode, he was so eaten up by knowing that Glantz had gotten away with murder that he crossed the line and beat Glantz, saying, "Is that sexy? Do you like that?" Similarly, in "Junk Love,' he didn't even try to stop Rosella from shooting her abusive father and showed more sympathy for her than Tubbs even before he knew what her true situation was. This unusually strong need to protect women may have stemmed from his childhood; if his father was, as was suggested in some episodes, alcoholic and frequently absentee, he may also have been abusive, giving Crockett a drive to protect other women as young Crockett could not protect his mother.


Generally, you get what you pay for, although there are some affordable options that can meet your needs. Less expensive shoulder holster models can be a one-size-fits-all option while a custom-made one can be pricier but offer the longevity you need instead of buying several because they break or do not fit right.


Originally, James "Sonny" Crockett was to use a SIG-Sauer P220 in .45 Auto which is evident in the pilot episode. He also carries a Detonics Pocket 9 as a backup, tucked in his rear waistband near the small of his back. But it was later decided that a more state-of-the-art gun was to be used by Don Johnson. During the first season, he used a Bren Ten pistol carried in a Ted Blocker "Lifeline" shoulder holster rig. Due to Don Johnson's dissatisfaction with the "Lifeline" rig, the Jackass Leather Company (later renamed Galco International) "Original Jackass Rig" shoulder holster rig was personally fitted for him by Rick Gallagher (President of Galco). Finally the Galco "Miami Classic" shoulder holster was designed and used. The Bren Ten, manufactured by Dornaus & Dixon, was a stainless steel handgun notable as the first ever chambered in the powerful 10 mm Auto caliber. The Bren Ten was originally manufactured as a two-tone weapon: the carbon steel slide was black oxide and frame was stainless steel. The model used in Miami Vice had a hard chromed matte finished slide so that it showed up better during night shots. The pistol used in the show was chambered in .45 ACP, as opposed to the standard 10mm Auto. After the Dornaus & Dixon company went out of business in 1986, the product placement contract went to Smith & Wesson. Starting with the third season, Sonny used a 2nd Generation series Smith & Wesson Model 645. This was a full-sized 5-inch-barreled stainless steel service pistol in .45ACP. Galco Gunleather, formerly Jackass Leather Co., built a "Miami Classic" shoulder holster for the S&W 645 used. In the Galco Gunleather headquarters, there is a large display that contains the Miami Vice shoulder holster rig that Don Johnson wore, accompanied by an autographed photo of him. In late 1988 Smith & Wesson unveiled their new 3rd Generation Series of auto pistols, so for the last season Sonny's Model 645 was replaced with the new Smith & Wesson Model 4506. This pistol had 20+ design improvements including a one piece arched grip. Sonny's M 4506 can be seen in the beginning of the episode "Victim of Circumstance" when he is sitting in a cafe and looking at it. Sonny also carried a .45 ACP Detonics Combat-Master backup gun in an ankle holster on his left leg, replacing the Pocket 9 from the pilot episode. It can be seen in the bar scene shootout in the "Prodigal Son" episodes. In the last series episode "Freefall" Crockett is placing what looks to be a S&W CS45 (compact alloy framed .45ACP) in his ankle holster.


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